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Billy Elliot (2005)

Victoria Palace Theatre
Londres - Angleterre

11/05/2005 > 09/04/2016

Détails de cette production  

Lieu

Victoria Palace Theatre - Londres - Angleterre

Dates

Première Preview: jeudi 31 mars 2005
Première: mercredi 11 mai 2005
Dernière: samedi 09 avril 2016

News

Fermeture annoncée de "Billy Elliot" en avril 2016 (11 décembre 2015)
La production londonienne de Billy Elliot - The Musical, qui fêtrera son 11ème anniversaire au Victoria Palace Theatre en mars l'année prochaine, a annoncé que le spectacle fermera dans ce théâtre le 9 avril 2016, avant une rénovation du théâtre.

Artistes

Mise en scène:
Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie:
Peter Darling
Avec:
Cast: James Lomas/George Maguire/Liam Mower (Billy), Haydn Gwynne (Mrs Wilkinson), Tim Healy (Dad), Joe Caffrey (Tony), Ann Emery (Grandma), Trevor Fox (George), Steve Elias (Mr Braithwaite), Stephanie Putson (Dead Mum), Isaac James (Older Billy), Brad Kavanagh/Ashley Long/Ryan Longbottom (Michael), Brook Havana Bailey/Emma Hudson/Lucy Stephenson (Debbie),

Presse

Les critiques sont très très bonnes:

MICHAEL BILLINGTON du THE GUARDIAN: "Billy Elliot succeeds brilliantly because Elton John's music and, especially, Peter Darling's choreography enhance Lee Hall's cinematic concept."
BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE du THE TIMES: "Tougher, bolder and, as my tear-ducts can attest, more moving than its admittedly admirable celluloid precursor. ...If there is a disappointment, it is Elton John’s music, which begins promisingly, with a church-like paean to cameraderie, but never seems either tuneful or original."
CHARLES SPENCER du THE DAILY TELEGRAPH: "Billy Elliot strikes me as the greatest British musical I have ever seen."
ALASTAIR MACAULAY du THE FINANCIAL TIMES: "Elton John's music is too often formulaic but about half of this show achieves dramatic poetry of a kind rare in any kind of theatre."
PAUL TAYLOR du THE INDEPENDENT: "Funny, touching and shamelessly enjoyable staging."

Commentaire

The musical was based on the 2000 film of the same name. The original film was partly inspired by A.J. Cronin’s 19 novel “The Stars Look Down”. The musical earned excellent notices - "the greatest British musical I have ever seen" (Daily Telegraph), "a theatrical masterpiece" (Daily Mail) and won four Olivier Awards, including Best New Musical and Best Actor in a Musical awarded jointly to all three boys who played Billy. The Broadway production opened in November 2008, earning totally rave reviews, winning ten Tony Awards, and recovering its entire $18 million investment in 14 months. (The New York production closed on January 8th, 2012 following 40 previews and 1,304 performances.)

 

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Billy Elliot (2005-05-Victoria Palace-London)

Qualité: ***** Intérêt: ****
Langue:
Anglais Durée:


 

CD de cette production

2005-05-Original London Cast

Stars:
Date de sortie:
2005-05-??
Type de CD:
Stage Cast •
Nombre de CD:
1 pour un total de 18 tracks
Artistes:
Craig Armstrong, Brooke Havana Bailey, Michael Blake, Poppy Coggins, Danny Coll, Erica Ann Deakin, Alex Delamere, Damien Delaney, Michael Dove, Yona Dunsford, Steve Elias, Ann Emery, Susan Fay, Alan Forrester, Trevor Fox, Haydn Gwynne, Christie Halsey, Charlotte Hamilton, Tim Healy, Chris Hornby, Isaac James, Alison Jiear, Emma Kershaw, Gillian Kirkpatrick, Chris Lennon, James Lomas, George Maguire, David Massey, Michelle McAvoy, Liam Mower, Emily Neil, Daniel Page, Steve Paget, Tom Pearce, Simon Preece, Lee Proud, Stephanie Putson, Stephanie Rawson, Mike Scott, Samantha Shaw, Phil Snowden, Alice Stephen, Katie Stephen, David Porter Thomas, Jennifer Veal, Matthew White, Ellie Jaine Woolf, Tessa Worsley
Tracks:
Disque1
01. The Stars Look Down [7:31]
02. Shine [6:07]
03. Grandma's Song [4:40]
04. Solidarity [8:55]
05. Expressing Yourself [5:13]
06. The Letter [3:47]
07. Born to Boogie [4:25]
08. Angry Dance [3:49]
09. Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher [3:26]
10. Deep Into the Ground [3:36]
11. He Could Be a Star [4:51]
12. Electricity [5:54]
13. Once We Were Kings [4:14]
14. The Letter [2:53]
15. Finale [5:35]

Disque 2
01. The Letter -- Elton John [Electricity - 2005 Elton John] [2:31]
02. Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher -- Elton John [Electricity - 2005 Elton John] [3:35]
03. Electricity -- Elton John [Electricity - 2005 Elton John] [3:31]
Commentaires:
Barnes & Noble
Elton John is no stranger to theatrical productions -- make that hit theatrical productions. Aida and The Lion King established the pop phenomenon as a bona fide Broadway-bound composer, comfortable with the established conventions of writing for the stage. Billy Elliot finds John extending his winning streak with a score that abounds with his customary melodicism, tinged with drama and wit. Adapted from the 2000 family-favorite film of the same name, Billy Elliott provides John and lyricist Lee Hall with a wide canvas, corresponding to the plot’s blend of musical hall razzle-dazzle with the pathos arising from a miners' strike and Billy’s difficult home life. Whether it's the stirring miners’ anthems "The Stars Look Down" and “Once We Were Kings," the rousing “Shine,” “Electricity,” and "Expressing Yourself,” the slashing “Angry Dance,” or the heart-tugging ballad "The Letter," John gets to flaunt his range as well as his sheer enthusiasm for theatrical songcraft. The songs not only work within the show’s context but are also memorable enough to stand independently on a cast album. And speaking of casts: The score is further elevated by such striking talents as Liam Mower in the title role and Hadyn Gwynne as Billy's tough but tender dance teacher. It adds up to another winner of a show from John, a golden-touch composer for all seasons. [Parents should note that the song "Solidarity" has explicit lyrics inappropriate for children.] William Pearl

All Music Guide

The triumph that is the stage adaptation of the film Billy Elliot is all the more remarkable when one considers the many ways it could have gone wrong. Director Stephen Daldry's 2000 movie about a pre-adolescent boy in an English mining town discovering his love of dancing against a background of struggle among striking mine workers was set in 1984, but made excellent use of a score full of '70s songs by T. Rex and several new wave bands. A stage producer might have tried to turn it into a T. Rex jukebox musical, but that didn't happen. When The Full Monty, a British film with a similar setting and themes, was made into a musical, the story was moved to the U.S., and an American composer, David Yazbek, brought in. The results weren't embarrassing, by any means, but the British flavor of the piece was lost. That didn't happen to Billy Elliot, either. The hiring of Elton John as composer may have been the most dangerous choice in adapting the work, however. John has enjoyed success with the film-to-stage transfer of The Lion King, of course, and his Aida even won a Tony Award against a weak field in 2000, but he hasn't really been accepted in the musical theater ranks. Billy Elliot, which opened in London on May 11, 2005, should change that. John, who came out of a working-class background and overcame his father's resistance and other social pressures to attend the Royal Academy of Music, must have felt a special affinity for the story of a boy who does exactly the same thing, even though he winds up at the Royal Ballet School. As a result, he hasn't just dashed off a few pop songs that he could have sung himself and called it a score. His two main influences seem to have been the quintessentially English soccer anthem and swing music. The former serves him well in writing the many choral numbers in which the miners declare "solidarity forever" and the police respond derisively. The swing element serves the many dance numbers, and there's plenty of dancing. But if John is gifted in his ability to compose pastiche numbers nearly as good as the originals, he also knows his way around a ballad, and his music for such songs as "The Letter" (sung in the words of the boy's dead mother) and "Electricity" (in which the boy tries to explain how dancing makes him feel) is as appealing as anything he's ever written. But John's music is only one element in the production. An even stronger one is Lee Hall's libretto and lyrics, which bring out the twin aspects of the story, contrasting the miners' troubles with the boy's. Hall captures not only the idealism of socialism as it encountered the harsh policies of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's conservative regime, but also Billy Elliot's emergence as a dancer against the odds. And the score is well realized by a cast including Liam Mower in the title role and Haydn Gwynne as the dance teacher. Running 75 minutes, the original London cast recording is an excellent rendition of an excellent musical work. Elton John has done too much good work to call Billy Elliot his greatest achievement, but it is certainly the most outstanding theatrical project with which he has been involved so far, and it finally establishes his claim as a legitimate theater composer. [This edition includes a bonus CD containing three Elton John recordings of songs from the show. His performances of "The Letter" and "Electricity" have the unintended effect of demonstrating how impressive Martin Koch's orchestrations for the show are, since in John's hands they just sound like typical tracks that could be on any Elton John album. But the real corker is John's decision to record his own rendition of "Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher," the miners' sarcastic holiday song, in which they celebrate Christmas only because it brings the hated prime minister one day closer to her death. This must be the most politically charged song John has ever recorded, and it is especially provocative taken out of the context of the show and dressed up in a catchy pop/rock arrangement.] ~ William Ruhlmann, Rovi

Billy Elliot (2005-05-Original London Cast)

Stars:
Date de sortie:
27/06/1905
Type de CD:
Stage Cast •
Nombre de CD:
pour un total de tracks
Artistes:
Craig Armstrong, Brooke Havana Bailey, Michael Blake, Poppy Coggins, Danny Coll, Erica Ann Deakin, Alex Delamere, Damien Delaney, Michael Dove, Yona Dunsford, Steve Elias, Ann Emery, Susan Fay, Alan Forrester, Trevor Fox, Haydn Gwynne, Christie Halsey, Charlotte Hamilton, Tim Healy, Chris Hornby, Isaac James, Alison Jiear, Emma Kershaw, Gillian Kirkpatrick, Chris Lennon, James Lomas, George Maguire, David Massey, Michelle McAvoy, Liam Mower, Emily Neil, Daniel Page, Steve Paget, Tom Pearce, Simon Preece, Lee Proud, Stephanie Putson, Stephanie Rawson, Mike Scott, Samantha Shaw, Phil Snowden, Alice Stephen, Katie Stephen, David Porter Thomas, Jennifer Veal, Matthew White, Ellie Jaine Woolf, Tessa Worsley
Tracks:
Disque 1 - 1 The Stars Look Down / 2 Shine / 3 Grandma's Song / 4 Solidarity / 5 Expressing Yourself / 6 The Letter / 7 Born To Boogie / 8 Angry Dance / 9 Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher / 10 Deep Into The Ground / 11 He Could Be A Star / 12 Electricity / 13 Once We Were Kings / 14 The Letter - Reprise / 15 Finale - Disque2 - 1 The Letter (Bonus CD) Bonus Track / 2 Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher (Bonus CD) Bonus Track / 3 Electricity (Bonus CD) Bonus Track
Commentaires:
Barnes & Noble
Elton John is no stranger to theatrical productions -- make that hit theatrical productions. Aida and The Lion King established the pop phenomenon as a bona fide Broadway-bound composer, comfortable with the established conventions of writing for the stage. Billy Elliot finds John extending his winning streak with a score that abounds with his customary melodicism, tinged with drama and wit. Adapted from the 2000 family-favorite film of the same name, Billy Elliott provides John and lyricist Lee Hall with a wide canvas, corresponding to the plot’s blend of musical hall razzle-dazzle with the pathos arising from a miners' strike and Billy’s difficult home life. Whether it's the stirring miners’ anthems "The Stars Look Down" and “Once We Were Kings," the rousing “Shine,” “Electricity,” and "Expressing Yourself,” the slashing “Angry Dance,” or the heart-tugging ballad "The Letter," John gets to flaunt his range as well as his sheer enthusiasm for theatrical songcraft. The songs not only work within the show’s context but are also memorable enough to stand independently on a cast album. And speaking of casts: The score is further elevated by such striking talents as Liam Mower in the title role and Hadyn Gwynne as Billy's tough but tender dance teacher. It adds up to another winner of a show from John, a golden-touch composer for all seasons. [Parents should note that the song "Solidarity" has explicit lyrics inappropriate for children.] William Pearl

All Music Guide
The triumph that is the stage adaptation of the film Billy Elliot is all the more remarkable when one considers the many ways it could have gone wrong. Director Stephen Daldry's 2000 movie about a pre-adolescent boy in an English mining town discovering his love of dancing against a background of struggle among striking mine workers was set in 1984, but made excellent use of a score full of '70s songs by T. Rex and several new wave bands. A stage producer might have tried to turn it into a T. Rex jukebox musical, but that didn't happen. When The Full Monty, a British film with a similar setting and themes, was made into a musical, the story was moved to the U.S., and an American composer, David Yazbek, brought in. The results weren't embarrassing, by any means, but the British flavor of the piece was lost. That didn't happen to Billy Elliot, either. The hiring of Elton John as composer may have been the most dangerous choice in adapting the work, however. John has enjoyed success with the film-to-stage transfer of The Lion King, of course, and his Aida even won a Tony Award against a weak field in 2000, but he hasn't really been accepted in the musical theater ranks. Billy Elliot, which opened in London on May 11, 2005, should change that. John, who came out of a working-class background and overcame his father's resistance and other social pressures to attend the Royal Academy of Music, must have felt a special affinity for the story of a boy who does exactly the same thing, even though he winds up at the Royal Ballet School. As a result, he hasn't just dashed off a few pop songs that he could have sung himself and called it a score. His two main influences seem to have been the quintessentially English soccer anthem and swing music. The former serves him well in writing the many choral numbers in which the miners declare "solidarity forever" and the police respond derisively. The swing element serves the many dance numbers, and there's plenty of dancing. But if John is gifted in his ability to compose pastiche numbers nearly as good as the originals, he also knows his way around a ballad, and his music for such songs as "The Letter" (sung in the words of the boy's dead mother) and "Electricity" (in which the boy tries to explain how dancing makes him feel) is as appealing as anything he's ever written. But John's music is only one element in the production. An even stronger one is Lee Hall's libretto and lyrics, which bring out the twin aspects of the story, contrasting the miners' troubles with the boy's. Hall captures not only the idealism of socialism as it encountered the harsh policies of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's conservative regime, but also Billy Elliot's emergence as a dancer against the odds. And the score is well realized by a cast including Liam Mower in the title role and Haydn Gwynne as the dance teacher. Running 75 minutes, the original London cast recording is an excellent rendition of an excellent musical work. Elton John has done too much good work to call Billy Elliot his greatest achievement, but it is certainly the most outstanding theatrical project with which he has been involved so far, and it finally establishes his claim as a legitimate theater composer. [This edition includes a bonus CD containing three Elton John recordings of songs from the show. His performances of "The Letter" and "Electricity" have the unintended effect of demonstrating how impressive Martin Koch's orchestrations for the show are, since in John's hands they just sound like typical tracks that could be on any Elton John album. But the real corker is John's decision to record his own rendition of "Merry Christmas Maggie Thatcher," the miners' sarcastic holiday song, in which they celebrate Christmas only because it brings the hated prime minister one day closer to her death. This must be the most politically charged song John has ever recorded, and it is especially provocative taken out of the context of the show and dressed up in a catchy pop/rock arrangement.] ~ William Ruhlmann, Rovi

 

D'autres versions de cette oeuvre

Version 1

Victoria Palace Theatre à Londres (Original)
Durée : 10 ans 11 mois
Nombre :
Première Preview : jeu 31 mars 2005
Première : mer 11 mai 2005
Dernière : sam 09 avril 2016
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec : Cast: James Lomas/George Maguire/Liam Mower (Billy), Haydn Gwynne (Mrs Wilkinson), Tim Healy (Dad), Joe Caffrey (Tony), Ann Emery (Grandma), Trevor Fox (George), Steve Elias (Mr Braithwaite), Stephanie Putson (Dead Mum), Isaac James (Older Billy), Brad Kavanagh/Ashley Long/Ryan Longbottom (Michael), Brook Havana Bailey/Emma Hudson/Lucy Stephenson (Debbie),
Commentaires : The musical was based on the 2000 film of the same name. The original film was partly inspired by A.J. Cronin’s 19 novel “The Stars Look Down”. The musical earned excellent notices - "the greatest British musical I have ever seen" (Daily Telegraph), "a theatrical masterpiece" (Daily Mail) and won four Olivier Awards, including Best New Musical and Best Actor in a Musical awarded jointly to all three boys who played Billy. The Broadway production opened in November 2008, earning totally rave reviews, winning ten Tony Awards, and recovering its entire $18 million investment in 14 months. (The New York production closed on January 8th, 2012 following 40 previews and 1,304 performances.)
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 2

Capitol Theatre à Sydney (Revival)
Durée : 12 mois
Nombre :
Première Preview : Inconnu
Première : mar 13 novembre 2007
Dernière : dim 09 novembre 2008
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 3

LG Arts Centre à Séoul (Revival)
Durée : Se joue actuellement
Nombre :
Première Preview : mar 10 août 2010
Première : sam 14 août 2010
Dernière : Open end, ouvert actuellement jusqu'au mer 31 décembre 1969
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 4

Imperial Theatre à Broadway (Original Broadway)
Durée : 3 ans 1 mois 3 semaines
Nombre : 40 previews - 1304 représentations
Première Preview : mer 01 octobre 2008
Première : jeu 13 novembre 2008
Dernière : dim 08 janvier 2012
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 5

Her Majesty's Theatre à Melbourne (Revival)
Durée : 6 mois
Nombre :
Première Preview : Inconnu
Première : sam 13 décembre 2008
Dernière : dim 14 juin 2009
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 6

Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre à Chicago (Revival)
Durée : 7 mois 3 semaines
Nombre :
Première Preview : jeu 18 mars 2010
Première : dim 11 avril 2010
Dernière : dim 28 novembre 2010
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 7

Canon Theatre à Toronto (Revival)
Durée : Se joue actuellement
Nombre :
Première Preview : Inconnu
Première : mar 01 février 2011
Dernière : Open end, ouvert actuellement jusqu'au mer 31 décembre 1969
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie : Peter Darling
Avec :
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version

Version 8

Afas Circustheater à Scheveningen (Revival)
Durée : 11 mois 1 semaine
Nombre :
Première Preview : Inconnu
Première : dim 30 novembre 2014
Dernière : sam 07 novembre 2015
Mise en scène : Stephen Daldry
Chorégraphie :
Avec : Pia Douwes (Mrs. Wilkinson), Bas Heerkens (Father), Reinier Demeijer (Brother), Carry Tefsen (Grandmother)
Commentaires :
En savoir plus sur cette version